The original writeup is here: http://univacgrl.livejournal.com/229246.html Now it's time to rewrite the recipe so I don't have to do the math and the substitutions in my head at the same time. No ketchup required.

Mexican Lasagna (aka MexiLas)

For the filling:
2 cups of cooked chicken, cut or torn into bite-sized pieces (chicken thighs stand up better to the sauce)
1 package low sodium taco seasoning mix (or about 4 teaspoons if you roll your own) 
1 28 oz can tomato sauce
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup dried chopped onion
8 oz balsamic vinegar (1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons)
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1 cup water
1 16 oz bag frozen corn niblets 
2 15 oz cans of black beans (or 1 each of black and pinto beans), drained and rinsed

For the structure:
6-8 soft tortillas (soft taco size) or 4 burrito size tortillas cut to fit in the casserole dish
4 cups shredded Mexican cheese mixture (or 4 cups grated your favorite mix of cheeses here)
1/2 6 oz can of small olives (use the whole can if you really like olives)
6-8 oz cream cheese cubed or cut into small portions
2 cups full fat sour cream
Parsley flakes and paprika for garnish

Glass or ceramic casserole dish (9 x 13 inches or larger) (tomato sauce will etch your metal pans and you will be unhappy)
Rimmed sheet pan to put under the casserole dish when it goes into the oven, because it will bubble over and spill

Make the filling:  In a large heavy saucepan combine the chicken, taco seasoning, dried onion, tomato sauce, cinnamon, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, and water. Bring to a low boil and simmer for 20 minutes.  Add corn and beans and return to simmering for another 10 minutes.  

Build the lasagna:  Pour 1/3 of the sauce into the pan, then top with a single layer of tortillas to cover the whole surface.  Press gently into the pan. Sprinkle 1/2 of the cheese evenly over the tortilla layer, dot entire layer with olives and dollops of cream cheese.  Cover with half of the remaining sauce and another layer of tortillas.  Press firmly into the pan. Layer the rest of the cheese, then the olives and more dollops of cream cheese evenly over this layer.  Add the rest of the sauce and the last of the tortillas and press firmly into the pan again.  Spread a thick layer of sour cream from edge to edge of the dish as if frosting a sheet cake.  Garnish with paprika. Bake in 350 F oven on top of a rimmed sheet pan for 25 to 30 minutes, or until heated through. Sprinkle with parsley flakes.  Allow to cool slightly before serving in 3" square slices. 

It took me over a week to make this, because life kind of grinds me down, but it's pretty easily broken down into a very few steps.  Cook the chicken, refrigerate it overnight, then debone and shred the cold meat.  This step could be made even simpler by substituting browned ground meat (turkey or pork).  Make the filling then put it in the fridge for a few days, letting the flavors marry and making the filling thicker but easier to work with.  Build the casserole and bake it.  You'll have leftovers unless you're feeding several people.
 I've managed to solve the food problem for several upcoming meals with some concerted effort this morning.  I finished putting together the Mexican lasagna casserole that I'd started last weekend.  I had almost all the stuff  and the filling half made as of last Saturday, but for much of the week it was too much to think about.  Today I got up earlier than I had been doing on these days off (and actually took my medication on time for once) and got to work before I got distracted.  It was a little bit different putting it together, and not difficult, it just took a lot  of energy to overcome my own inertia.  

Day 30:

Once that inertia was overcome, I couldn't stop.  After I got the casserole in the oven I sat down intending to do nothing for a while, but there was a shoebox full of random crap next to my side of the sofa that I suddenly needed to empty as soon as possible. It was stuff taken from near my nightstand with some recyclables and some old mail.  A stray bungee cord took me down to the garage to put away into the toolbox.  Then I saw most of the cordless phones in the stuff bucket (yes, it's a bucket literally has the word "STUFF" written on it in white letters, and it was a wedding gift).  I wanted to use the bucket for used kitchen towels so I decided it was time to reunite the phones.  I chugged back upstairs for the one stray and put them all in their own box.  Since we don't have a landline anymore the box of phones went into the Go-Away pile.  Back downstairs there were more shoeboxes full of bathroom stuff, over the counter meds and the like, and I got rid of all the expired ones.  They went into their trash and the packaging went into the recycling bin. Coming back upstairs to pull the casserole out of the oven I saw a ratty stained burnt and partly melted oven mitt with the Sugar Daddy candy logo on it.  It had been given to me by crazy-ex-cow-orker number two years ago and it's falling apart.  I don't need a reminder of working with a drug addled con artist in my life anymore so I trashed it.


 I have been having trouble with food this week: not wanting to eat, not wanting to eat anything in the house, not wanting to go out to get anything to eat.  It all seems like it's too much to bother with.  I've also had days where I go too long before eating, and subsequently go a little crazy with some sort of disordered thinking.  Usually it's depression/apathy, but sometimes it's anger.  Today was the latter.

Day 29:

I was determined to go down to the garage and empty a box this morning, after spending most of it lounging in bed.  I grabbed a food bar and sent D off to get himself some doughnuts in Pismo for National Doughnut day, asking him not to bring back any for me.  But he asked me what my favorite doughnut was, and I launched into a detailed description (devil's food with chocolate frosting and nuts). Kind of futile since I don't eat them much anymore, but I could practically taste it.  And so I went into the garage, and started getting angry over nothing.  Found an accessible box and started digging in to it. It had been filled, and then turned upside down. Grrr.  It was a box full of random stuff: shoeboxes (with shoes in them), craft supplies, a box of scarves, some Halloween decorations. I sorted most of it, deciding to transfer some of it into another (smaller) box for another day, some to my closet upstairs, some recycling, and several things to go away.  But then I started getting frustrated trying to find a box, because there was other stuff in the way.  And then I was obsessed with getting some slats from blinds that had been left in the garage when we'd moved in, and stuff got piled on top of it. (Ok, just the bicycles, but I needed the slats to go.)  And one of our better carpets had been folded up and tossed on the ground, which contributed to the anger.  I swept the garage floor so I could roll it up instead of leaving it folded.

As I was rolling that carpet up correctly, D rolled up, and I think I'd been going a bit fractal for a while.  I somehow managed to let him know I wanted the blinds to go, even though I was waffling about whether they should be trashed or recycled. Then we "discussed" placing the nice carpet, with a lot of fuss from me. D asked if he should take it up to the balcony in front of the door so he could vacuum it and then bring it in. Of course I had to demand that it happen this weekend.  And when I went upstairs, I saw he'd dropped it without sweeping and I started getting angrier. And this is the point at which I realized I was going down the rabbit hole.  I had to finish the box, because going fractal means me getting obsessive, and luckily I was almost done with the damned thing.    I kept thinking to myself, just finish, then food. Went upstairs and made scrambled eggs since I haven't gotten the hang of making an omelet on the electric stove yet, which calmed me down almost immediately

Today's items:

An old backpack that I'd found outside my apartment before I'd started dating D.
A papercrafting item, the prize from a kid's meal at a fast food restaurant, still lovingly preserved in the original plastic wrapper.
A couple of gift bows that had obviously been used and stored to be reused.
A tiny pinky ring, probably from a vending machine.
A pair of baby teething toys (from my days as a wanna-be raver back in the 90's).
A lime green padded zippered pouch.  It's so my color! My best friend gave it to me! I've never used it!
A black square yard scarf.  I've probably used it a few times, but it's itchy.
Two identical scarves, one in pastel pink, the other in pastel green. (Really, past me? Pastels? Pastels look awful on me.)
A set of four cardboard coasters with Star Trek ships on them. I'm not sure if I should claim these as they were D's, but when he said he didn't want them my hoarder brain wanted me to grab them and hold them and love them and keep them forever.  (Shut up, Charlotte!)  Putting them in the Go-Away box was an act of will.


univacgrl: (Default)
( Mar. 16th, 2015 07:48 pm)
I came home from work a little bit late this evening, but I did not fall into a pit of despair, for there were LEFTOVERS IN THE FRIDGE from yesterday's cauliflower and cheese adventure.  I don't know if I mentioned that I'd added frozen peas and mixed petite vegetables at the end of yesterday's cooking adventure, but I did.  It was still (salty and) bland, but the formerly frozen vegetables did add some texture and flavor that was missing from the recipe, but not nearly enough.

Today I took the leftovers out of the fridge and added a few things:  about 3/4 cup of nonfat milk, which thinned the sauce to an acceptable level, half of a bag of frozen cauliflower (the smaller pieces were better than the large-ish ones from the Costco bag), and a can of tuna.  The milk and extra cauliflower cut the saltiness of the sauce, while the tuna added some much-needed flavor (ok and probably a lot of salt, too, but it tasted so much better today).

I definitely won't make this recipe again as written, even without the salt. I like the idea, but the execution isn't for me. I'm not the type to plan meals that far ahead, because when I actually recognize that I'm hungry, I'm about ten minutes away from becoming hangry.  I would, however, make a from-scratch cheese sauce (I'd have to look up Alton Brown's macaroni and cheese recipe for one) or if I was really going to plan ahead, I'd have to break down the inertia and actually put the powdered cheese stuff from Amazon in my cart.  And then buy it. 

Tags:
I tried this recipe today and it just wasn't quite the Kraft-Dinner-replacement that I'd hoped it would be.  It was really bland, just kind of meh, and it tasted like canned cheese soup (which, to be fair, was the main ingredient, but just not what I was looking for)  I think I could get better results with making a sauce from the powdered cheese stuff you can get from Amazon (or the packets I've occasionally seen in the GF areas of certain markets) and dumping in microwaved frozen cauliflower.    And then adding a can of cream of mushroom soup and a can of tuna like karenbynight taught me to treat boxed macaroni and cheese.

The good about this recipe:  

Super fast, super easy.  Because I bought pre chopped cauliflower from Costco, preparation was even easier than as-written. If I'd gone with pre-shredded cheese it would have gone even faster.

The not so good:

Prep time is slightly longer than what it says on the tin. If you're going to prep a head of cauliflower, that will take most people about 5 minutes by itself, and then getting all of the soup out of the can takes a good few minutes more to do well. And you will want to heat it up slowly so it doesn't burn. So plan on at least 15 minutes of prep time.  (More if, like me, one cooks while hungry, which means gravity pulls down slightly harder in a three foot bubble around me.)

The sauce was too thick for my preferences.  If I do this again, I'll probably use regular fresh milk and more of it , and maybe nacho cheese flavored soup instead of the boring cheddar, or just start with the cream of mushroom and add cheese to it.

It was pretty salty.  I shouldn't have even added any salt to it, but I had already thrown it in when I realized that the condensed soup base was probably plenty salty enough. (Again, I should not cook while actively hungry.) Thank goodness I no longer trust the salt quantities in recipes anymore and only used half the amount of kosher type flakes. (This is where I shake my fist in the air and curse at Rachael Ray, whose recipes that I've tried as-written are super salty.)

The admonition to not use sharp cheddar should probably extend to using just cheddar cheese in the two cups it calls for.  It should be cut with at least a third of some other soft and melty cheese like Monterey jack or brie or gouda, or even an Italian mix or Mexican mix if you're going with pre-shredded.  I went with a block of mild cheddar from Costco and, while certainly not sharp, did seem like it was about to go grainy when I was serving it.

Since I was really looking for a substitute for macaroni and cheese, the three and a half hour cooking time really makes this not optimal for me.  As I mentioned at the top, a stovetop version would be a better option for doing this again.

spicysouthernkitchen.com/crock-pot-cauliflower-cheese/


Crock Pot Cauliflower and Cheese
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Tender and cheesy cauliflower is a cinch to make in a crock pot.
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 can condensed cheddar soup
  • 1 (5 ounce) can evaporated milk
  • ½ teaspoon salt [skip this, really!]
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • ¼ cup finely diced onion
  • 2 cups shredded cheddar
 
Instructions
  1. Grease the inside of a 3 to 4-quart crock pot.
  2. Place cauliflower florets in crock pot.
  3. In a medium saucepan, combine remaining ingredients. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until cheese is melted.
  4. Pour sauce over cauliflower.
  5. Cover crock pot and cook on low for 3 to 3½ hours, depending on how tender you want the cauliflower.
 
Notes
Note: Do not use extra-sharp cheddar cheese. It is too acidic and can turn grainy.

Tags:
univacgrl: (Default)
( Oct. 14th, 2013 09:32 pm)
At the Stoke The World festival this weekend, I had a great conversation with Greg's mom Jan on Saturday morning.  She and Bob had missed out on the chili dinner the night before and I wandered up to her to make sure they'd gotten breakfast, and to offer her a tiny vegetarian pumpkin muffin.  I finally got to tell her why I'd brought the muffins to share. 

Before Greg went into the hospital for the last time, his doctors told him he'd have to put on and maintain a certain weight.  In my mind, this translated into "Operation Fatten Up Greg."  So I baked up a whole mess of mini pumpkin muffins, a vegan variation of a recipe my mom used to make when I was a kid, something she'd clipped out of the local newspaper back in the 70's, and brought a small bag to his house. It was a cool afternoon and we fiddled with some computer equipment for a while.  Morgan was there too, doing the knitting thing, so I fetched mine too, and worked on it. Other people came by, staying for a little or a long while.  We listened to music, ordered Chinese food, ate some pumpkin muffins for dessert, and just sat together, not talking much, enjoying each other's presence.  It was the last time I got to spend with Greg, and I can reach back for that warm peaceful evening in my memory whenever I smell the muffins. 

I promised I'd share the recipe with fellow STW folks. I've made some modifications to the original, which I've put into brackets.

Monastery Pumpkin Bread, recipe originally from  Monastery of the Angels in Los Angeles, California

3 ½ cups sifted flour
3 cups sugar
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
[1 teaspoon ground ginger]
[ ½ teaspoon ground allspice]
[ ½ teaspoon ground cloves]
1 ½ teaspoons salt
4 eggs [Vegan version: 1 cup unsweetened applesauce or extra pumpkin puree plus 2 teaspoons baking powder]
1 cup oil [substitute more applesauce for any fraction of the oil; I used 3/4 c oil and 1/4 c applesauce] 
2⁄3 cup water
2 cups pumpkin, cooked & mashed or 1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree
1 ½ cups walnuts, chopped  [may substitute pumpkin seeds]
walnut halves, for decoration [again, use pumpkin seeds instead]
[semi-sweet chocolate chips, which knock the flavor out of the park, but aren't vegan, just vegetarian]
 
Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
In a large bowl mix together flour, sugar, baking soda, spices, [baking powder] and salt.
Combine eggs [or applesauce], oil, water, and pumpkin and mix well.
Stir wet ingredients into the dry ingredients.
Fold in the chopped walnuts [or pumpkin seeds, which I omitted for the mini muffins].
Turn into three greased 8 X 4-inch loaf pans. [Portion into lined mini-muffin tins using a cookie dough scoop]
Top with a few walnut halves [or chocolate chips or pumpkin seeds, but really, you know you want to use both]
Bake for one hour or until a wood pick inserted in the center of a loaf comes out clean.
Cool before removing from the pans.
 
Notes: 

Since this is a quick-bread, substituting in a gluten-free baking mix  shouldn't change much about it except to make it a little bit crumblier.  It might be easier to line a loaf pan with parchment or foil to make the bread easier to remove. (I wish I could have accommodated the gluten-free folks, but my kitchen is too gluten enabled to keep people from getting sick, no matter how well-intentioned I might try to be.)
 
The loaves freeze very well if wrapped in foil first. 

Mini-muffins took 35-40 minutes to bake instead of an hour.
 
Vegan variation:  Instead of eggs, I substituted 1 cup of applesauce and 2 teaspoons of baking powder.  It made absolutely no difference in flavor or texture.  
 
This makes a whole lot of pumpkin bread; three one-pound loaves is almost too much. The yield in mini-muffins of the size I took to STW was approximately 75.  
 
Use paper liners if you go with muffins.  Trust me, you do not want to spend all your time thoroughly greasing those tiny individual muffin cups, unless you really dig that sort of thing.
 
   

univacgrl: (Default)
( Feb. 17th, 2013 07:07 pm)
This weekend I'd planned to finally bake a cheesecake. Low-carb cheesecake, but cheesecake nonetheless. I started with this recipe: http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/desserts/r/lcarbcheesecake.htm?p=1 and made a few changes.

Actual Recipe here )


First off, the pan. I'm using a springform pan I found in the back of my cabinet a couple of months ago that I know I bought sometime in the distant past and that I'd never used. Making the decision to keep it was the genesis of this project. The pan's big, ten inches or so, so I wasn't sure how this recipe would fill it. But hey, nothing ventured...

Reading around the interwebz, I saw several references to prepping the pan with butter or parchment or both. A neat trick someone wrote about was using a big piece of parchment paper, and instead of cutting it to size, you just clip it into the pan itself with the bottom. Genius! (I hate trying to cut things exactly, because I get a little compulsive about trying to make it perfect, so it would always turn out a little small.

So, pan prepared, I started putting the crust together. I've never worked with almond meal before, so I wasn't sure quite how to measure it. ProTip: don't just pour it into a measuring container, pack that almond meal in.

Since I've been using the granulated fake sugar sweetener in other things, I've not been happy with how sweet things come out. My taste buds have really acclimated because it's all too bloody sweet! I decided to use half the sweetener called for in this recipe (but all the butter, of course). Because of my loose measuring, there wasn't nearly enough material to cover the bottom of the springform, so I made another "half batch" to fill it up. Oh, and I'd forgotten to butter the damn pan! I scratched the crust out of the pan, then buttered it thoroughly, then re-patted the crust into it.

The rest of the recipe was pretty straightforward, except for halving the sweetener here, too. I did use Neufchatel instead of cream cheese (because that's what I buy), and I accidentally added a tablespoon of vanilla instead of the amount called for. I used one of Dean's tree's Meyer lemons for the juice (fresh off the tree!). Tasting the batter, it was definitely sweet, but not super-duper sweet, like I'd been afraid of.

In the future I might mix the sweetener with the eggs, vanilla and the lemon juice before adding them into the batter. The brand I use is very powdery, and even though I added it slowly, there was still a lot of powder to try and tap into the mixing bowl (and a lot that just flew into the air).

It's baking right now (17 minutes to go), and I'm also thinking about adding a topping, like in the Low-Carb Lemon Cheesecake that's linked on the original page. I've already got the lemon and the sour cream.

Topping )

So I think it'll come out pretty tasty, and even if it doesn't, I already got to lick the mixing bowl, so I'll call it a win.
Tags:
This is the best apple pie ever. I'm not even going to be humble about it. It's just that good.

How this recipe came into my life. )

French Apple Pie
This is apple pie with the "a la mode" built right in.
1 egg
1 cup (1/2 pint) dairy sour cream, room temperature
3/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
Dash salt
2-1/2 cups finely chopped, peeled cooking apples (2 to 3 apples)
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel (I just use some lemon juice)
1 unbaked Standard pastry crust
Crumb topping, see below.

Crumb Topping:
1/4 cup (or 1 or 1/2) stick butter, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 450F (232C). Beat egg in a large bowl; blend in sour cream, sugar, flour, vanilla, and salt. Fold in apple and lemon juice. Pour into Standard pastry crust, and bake 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350F (177C) and bake 30 minutes longer or until crust is golden brown. While pie is baking, prepare Crumb Topping. Sprinkle topping over pie and bake 15 minutes longer. Serve warm or cool. Makes 6 to 8 servings per pie.

Crumb Topping:
Cut butter into sugar, flour and cinnamon. Electric mixer can be used.

Things I scrawled on the bottom of the xerox copy:
Double the recipe and use a deep dish pie crust.
Cover the crust with strips of aluminum foil or crust protectors until the last 30 minutes or so of baking so that it won't burn.

Sometimes there's a small amount of leftover filling (apples rarely come out to even measurements) so I make an individual pie-ette, sans crust. You could probably divvy up the whole recipe into parchment paper-lined ramekins and skip the crust altogether. I totally would.
This is the best apple pie ever. I'm not even going to be humble about it. It's just that good.

My history with this recipe )

French Apple Pie
This is apple pie with the "a la mode" built right in.

1 egg
1 cup (1/2 pint) dairy sour cream, room temperature
3/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
Dash salt
2-1/2 cups finely chopped, peeled cooking apples (2 to 3 apples)
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel (I just use some lemon juice)
1 unbaked Standard pastry crust
Crumb topping, see below.

Crumb Topping:
1/4 cup (or 1 or 1/2) stick butter, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 450F (232C). Beat egg in a large bowl; blend in sour cream, sugar, flour, vanilla, and salt. Fold in apple and lemon juice. Pour into Standard pastry crust, and bake 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350F (177C) and bake 30 minutes longer or until crust is golden brown. While pie is baking, prepare Crumb Topping. Sprinkle topping over pie and bake 15 minutes longer. Serve warm or cool. Makes 6 to 8 servings per pie.

Crumb Topping:
Cut butter into sugar, flour and cinnamon. Electric mixer can be used.

Things I scrawled on the bottom of the xerox copy:
Double the recipe and use a deep dish pie crust.
Cover the crust with strips of aluminum foil or crust protectors until the last 30 minutes or so of baking so that it won't burn.

Sometimes there's a small amount of leftover filling (apples rarely come out to even measurements) so I make an individual pie-ette, sans crust.  You could probably divvy up the whole recipe into parchment paper-lined ramekins and skip the crust altogether.  I totally would.

Mexican Lasagne [aka MexiLas]

2 cups cubed cooked chicken
1 package Schilling Taco Seasoning Mix [low sodium]
1 8oz can tomato sauce
[1 cup frozen corn]
[1 can black beans]
[¼ teaspoon cinnamon]
[1 can small olives]
1 tablespoon brown sugar
3 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
½ cup catsup
1 cup water
6 soft tortillas
1 cup grated cheddar cheese [or grated mixed mexican cheeses]
1 cup commercial sour cream
Schilling parsley flakes
[paprika]

In saucepan combine chicken, seasoning mix, tomato sauce, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, catsup, corn, black beans, olives, and water. Bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes. Pour 1/3 of the sauce into 12 x 7 ½ x 1 ¾ -inch baking dish; cover with 2 tortillas, ½ of the cheese and half the remaining sauce. Repeat layers, ending with tortillas. Spread sour cream evenly over surface and sprinkle with paprika. Bake in 350°F oven 25 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley flakes. Makes 6 servings.

(stolen out of "Sauce-iology From the Schilling Division of McCormick & Co., Inc.")

This is the totally awesome casserole my mom used to make on special occasions. She gave me the original booklet a couple of years ago and it's delightfully retro, from the early 70's. When I went away to college, I copied it down by hand and took it with me. I've made some additions (the bits inside the brackets) that make it more of a meal-unto-itself rather than just a main dish. Now I make it for friends and gamers on special occasions. I've never made it in this small of a batch because the leftovers taste even better.
Mexican Lasagne [aka MexiLas]

2 cups cubed cooked chicken
1 package Schilling Taco Seasoning Mix [low sodium]
1 8oz can tomato sauce
[1 cup frozen corn]
[1 can black beans]
[¼ teaspoon cinnamon]
[1 can small olives]
1 tablespoon brown sugar
3 tablespoons vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
½ cup catsup
1 cup water
6 soft tortillas
1 cup grated cheddar cheese [or grated mixed mexican cheeses]
1 cup commercial sour cream
Schilling parsley flakes
[paprika]

In saucepan combine chicken, seasoning mix, tomato sauce, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, catsup, corn, black beans, olives, and water. Bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes. Pour 1/3 of the sauce into 12 x 7 ½ x 1 ¾ -inch baking dish; cover with 2 tortillas, ½ of the cheese and half the remaining sauce. Repeat layers, ending with tortillas. Spread sour cream evenly over surface and sprinkle with paprika. Bake in 350°F oven 25 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley flakes. Makes 6 servings.

(stolen out of "Sauce-iology From the Schilling Division of McCormick & Co., Inc.")

This is the totally awesome casserole my mom used to make on special occasions. She gave me the original booklet a couple of years ago and it's delightfully retro, from the early 70's. When I went away to college, I copied it down by hand and took it with me. I've made some additions (the bits inside the brackets) that make it more of a meal-unto-itself rather than just a main dish. Now I make it for friends and gamers on special occasions. I've never made it in this small of a batch because the leftovers taste even better.
.

Profile

univacgrl: (Default)
Cyrano de Univac

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags